Kyle Rennie will be competing in this year’s Comrades Marathon 2018 for the first time and is on a mission to raise funds for hospice who helped his grandmother and family when she was very ill. 

Could you please tell us a little about yourself?

I was born in Port Shepstone and grew up on the coast, I then moved to Johannesburg, South Africa in 1993 and have been here since then.

What got you started running?

I was never a runner to be honest! A couple friends of mine, Mike and Pam were doing the Parkrun’s and Sunday morning runs and I decided to get started with them there. Mike will be competing in his first comrades with me this year.

What do you enjoy about Comrades?

I grew up watching the Comrades Marathon on television.  Our family used to wake up just before the race started at 06h00am and watch until the end.  I still recall that was when Bruce Fordyce was on his winning streak.

How do you prepare for an event this big?

We only really started this year with the longer races.  I have competed in a few 21’k runs already and really struggled with my first 42’k two weeks ago. We are currently following a program that should help us complete the race in bronze medal time!

Who are your biggest fans/supporters?

My kids and girlfriend. They (kids) like to fight over the medal after a weekend race, I think they more worried about the medal than me!

What is your favourite food before and after a run?

I have been working on a diet and still finding my feet.  I follow a carb free diet occasionally but have been eating pasta from 2 nights before a big race and that seems to help a lot.

Do you enjoy running alone or prefer a group?

I find it easier to run by myself as I don’t like holding people up but, in a race, its better when you have the support and you have other people on the road pushing you along.

How has running changed your life?

I think it’s more on a social level and being fit.  I am recently divorced so maybe that’s why I’m more social but when you not running and tucked up in bed on a Sunday, you don’t realise that there is anywhere between 2000 and 5000 crazy people running.

Is there any particular reason why you chose hospice?

When my mother and I were in Port Shepstone and I was around 14 years old my grandmother was very ill. Hospice used to come in daily to bathe her and make her comfortable. When she took a turn for the worse there would be somebody with her 24hrs a day which gave my family some time to rest. They also helped us through the whole ordeal and were with us for about 6 days and were with us when she passed.  These were all volunteers and my mom still call’s them her “Angels in Blue”.